Michaelis, Small, and Marvin created the first public relations agency – the Publicity Bureau in Boston in the early years of the 20th century. Ivy Ledbetter Lee was the father of public relations and formed the nation’s third public relations firm in 1904. The rest is history.

Publicity for today’s creative artist comes in all forms and is found wherever it can be seen and/or heard. Of course, you have to have the solid knowledge of your area of expertise and be able to offer a desired service. If you are serious about your art form, let the public gain insight into who you are and what your work is about whether it is through television news, commercials, online and/or hard copy magazines, social and business Websites, blogs, and the like. I’ve done TV interviews, been a talk show guest, newspaper interviews, magazine interviews, and conducted on televised concerts in the US, Canada, and Europe.

My journey started late in terms of media composer, but it has not hindered me in the least bit. It has been a challenge at times, however, that was due in part to my speed at learning my way around and thinking more as an agent would think; in other words, putting on a different “hat” other than the “hat” of a composer. Everyone’s efforts, everyone’s journey should always be ongoing.

For those that would like to see more of my methods of gaining publicity, I’ve attached a few links. I hope that you will follow each of those links, and let me know what you think. There are many different ways to gain publicity in a positive way. Maybe you have better ideas that you would like to share. The learning should never stop. Thanks for visiting and let me know what you think are the best ways to gain increased public exposure. Get going and enjoy the journey!

My business Website

My IMDb Website

My Twitter

My Facebook business page

My LinkedIn page

The following article covering one of my former music students, Deric Dickens, that was kind enough to mention me and I was happy to do an interview. You can also visit the Website.

by Richard McLendon     March 1, 2016

Music is as old as the human species itself.  It has held people together surrounded by darkness with only the light of a fire to any number of venues where music is performed today.  It has taken people to war.  It has helped people through war and conflict. It continues to bring people together for different types of celebration and for remembrance. It has an intrinsic or fundamental value after many thousands of years.

Composers and musicians put in lengthy hours and years of studying, practicing, and perfecting their art, their skills, and their understanding of the complexities of music.  It never stops since true learning lasts a lifetime.  So many people enjoy music in the moment while at a concert or while driving or while shopping or while exercising, that most do not realize or fully appreciate the investment of time, money, and life into a music person’s gift.  Many people just take for granted that the music is like air – its there and free.  I am always taken aback when I hear someone make a comment like, “Well, you should’ve gotten a real job.”  Yes, there are still people that think that way.

It is the goal of true artists to make a living doing what they love – music.  Those people that give away their art in large quantities and the streaming industries that display artists that they use and pay very poorly, contribute to the mentality that many people have come to expect – free music or overly cheap music.

As in all things in life, there are disconnects in thinking. In the case of music, people think that artists are rich because the concert tickets were so expensive, or the band playing at the club must be rich because of the expensive tab last night and the place was packed again, yet people forget or don’t realize an important fact. Instruments, equipment, and education are expensive and in some instances very expensive.  I’ve always believed quality in will most always produce quality out.  You start with what you can afford with the goal to trade up in instrument quality.  As an example, really good artists know that the better quality of instrument that they own, the better the music will sound when they make it. That then makes for a better response from those that support musicians by buying their music. In turn, that results in a greater satisfaction for the artists in knowing that the job (performance) was well done.

Remember the old saying: “You get what you pay for.” I would say to the general public, stop expecting music for free.  Stop looking for ways to cheat artists. Stop hurting artists livelihoods by depriving them of being paid a fair wage for their hard work and investment of time and money.

When the public needs music, we don’t just jump out of caves with our clay pot drums and sing and grunt, or speed write a song or symphony or film score on demand.  Support the arts and support the artists that make the arts possible in today’s world. The artists in music deserve nothing less.  Don’t forget, we have to pay our bills and support our loved ones, too.

Let me know what you think.

RM Music Logo #5 (larger)